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Join us February 27th, for Legislative Day at the Capitol

Join us February 27th for Legislative Day at the Oklahoma State Capitol.

Legislative day is set to begin at 9 a.m. at the Oklahoma History Center, located near the Capitol, at 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive, in Oklahoma City. Attendees will hear from several speakers, then take buses to the Capitol to visit with legislators. Buses will then return attendees to the History Center for *lunch and a recap of the morning's activities.

Don't miss this opportunity to participate in this important event. AONP's annual Legislative Day allows our profession to meet one-on-one with the state's legislators to discuss our role as quality primary care providers and advocate for better access to quality health care with these decision-makers.

Click here to register


Oklahoma Nurse Practitioner's Mission 

Welcome to the official site of the Association of Oklahoma Nurse Practitioners (AONP). Our mission is to advance, support, and promote the high standards of health care delivered by nurse practitioners. We are dedicated to improving patient access to quality healthcare.

As a statewide professional association, we focus on the common needs of our members. We recognize the professional and political concerns facing nurse practitioners. AONP has always played a major role in facilitating and supporting changes in legislation that advance the role of the nurse practitioner. AONP believes that by providing better networking among our members, we will be better able to promote high standards of health care and thereby enhance the identity and continuity of nurse practitioners in our state.




What is a Nurse Practitioner?

A Nurse Practitioner (NP) is a registered nurse who is prepared, through advanced education and clinical training, to provide a wide range of preventive and health care services to individuals of all ages. NPs complete graduate-level education preparation that leads to a master's and/or doctoral degree. NPs provide physical examinations, diagnose and treat many common acute and chronic problems, interpret laboratory results and X-rays, prescribe and manage medications and other therapies, provide training and supportive counseling with an emphasis on prevention of illness and health maintenance, and refer patients to other health professionals as needed.

These informative videos explain the value of receiving health care from a nurse practitioner.

National Medical Report
Nurse Practitioners Leading the Charge




Ask The Expert

Question (February 2018): I work for a large healthcare system and work in two separate rural clinics/hospitals with one physician, who is designated on my prescriptive authority agreement. The organization is hiring a new physician to staff one of these clinics and I will be working with him as well. Do I need to have a prescriptive authority agreement with him? I have privileges in both rural hospitals and will be rounding on both of these physicians' patients.

Answer: 
No, you do not. You must have an arrangement with a physician for prescriptive authority. You only need one agreement.



Question (January 2018): 
Can a nurse practitioner admit a patient to the hospital? Is a physician required to co-sign admit and discharge orders to a hospital?

Answer: 
If you have hospital privileges, and each hospital board gets to decide who and who does not, then you have hospital privileges. Those privileges extend to admit and discharge. The only reason you have a supervising physician is for prescriptive authority.



Question (January 2018): 
I am a CRNA who has been in continuous practice in Texas since graduating in 1981. Upon applying for Advance Practice licensure in Oklahoma, I was informed that only graduates from a Masters level program are eligible in Oklahoma. As there were few to no masters programs in existence when I graduated, as states began instating the Master's requirement, those of us who graduated prior to the availability of a Masters degree was grandfathered in. I have attempted to get clarification on this from the board without success. can you shed any light on this??

Answer: 
According to the Oklahoma Board of Nursing, It is true that CRNAs who were licensed before the master's requirements were grandfathered in the states where they practice. However, to endorse into Oklahoma you would now need to meet the requirements for a masters degree. You were grandfathered in Texas, if you want an Oklahoma license, you would need a graduate degree (masters).



Click here to view previous questions in the Ask The Expert Archive

Do you have a question for the expert? Click here to submit it.

 

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more Calendar

2/19/2018
Deadline for HBs/HJRs out of Subcommittee

2/22/2018
AONP OKC Dinner Meeting

2/27/2018
Legislative Day 2018

2/28/2018
AONP Tulsa Dinner Meeting

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